Tuesday, June 4, 2013

152. Grimm Fairy Tales Presents: Sleepy Hollow by Dick Wickline

Sleepy Hollow by Dick Wickline. Art by Ac Osorio.
Grimm Fairy Tales Presents

Rating: (4/5)

(US) - (Canada)

Apr. 9. 2013, Zenescope, 144 pgs
Age: 18+

"In the small town of Tarry Town, New York the story of the headless horseman of Sleepy Hollow has become something of Myth and Legend.
A legend that is about to become all too real. When a prank goes deadly wrong those responsible will learn the truth behind the legend as the Headless Horseman returns to exact a horrifying revenge that none will ever forget. From the writer of Salem's Daughter: The haunting comes a tale of horror and terror that will leave you on the edge of your seats. Hold on to your hats...and your head."

Received an egalley from the publisher through NetGalley.

I really enjoy the books in this series and I loved this one.  To get the usual objectionals about this publisher out of the way: there is only one female character so not a lot of opportunity for the scantily clad buxom depictions but it's there when the artist gets the chance!  Surprisingly not a single curse word in this volume but violence galore.  Seeing as this is a reimagining of the "Headless Horseman", there is a lot of decapitations and general headlessness, so not for the weak of stomach.  Unlike others in this series which are more fairytales or fantasies this is classic horror.  A unique retelling of Washington Irving's tale which preserves his plot but expands upon it.  We start off with a brief scene from the revolutionary war that shows how the original headless horseman really came to be and then jump to the present with a college student who is an ancestor of this man.  In a mythology class they learn the legend of Sleepy Hollow then what follows is a college story of jocks and nerds, buying test answers, standing up for morals and a scare tactic gone dreadfully wrong.  The vengeance of the dead is gruesome and bloody, bringing about a genuine horror story which is original yet retains the essence of the original tale in the retelling.  

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